Read + Review, Teen Reviews, Uncategorized

The Last Olympian: the graphic novel by Robert Venditti

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As Kronos stirs within his realm, Percy Jackson receives a cryptic notice that the final battle of the Titans may transpire. Attaining the knowledge of a battle, the half-bloods residing at Long Island frantically attempt to prepare for the concluding war. Percy seeks the anguished tale of Luke Castellan, a former half-blood whose mind teeters at the mercy of the Titans.  The quaint army unearths discreet indications regarding the bloodstained legend of the Titans, including Kronos. Prophecies become reality during the final establishment of Percy Jackson’s war with the formidable Titans.

Unfortunately, the graphic novel of “The Last Olympian” proved as a rather baffling tale. I believe the plot was not correctly portrayed within the graphics, which did not aid in informing the reader. Furthermore, I became unable to the grasp the progression of events, and therefore failed to comprehend the story. Characters within the graphic novel arrived unannounced, and failed to provide names or purpose of presence. In brief, I became rather dissatisfied with the narration and description of the climax, plot, and characters.

A memorable event resides near the beginning of the novel, as Percy deftly battles Luke’s demon battalion. Countless weapons, including the vast array of swords, daggers, and crossbows, remain focused upon Percy. Entrapped within the cruel clutches of a departed ship, upon the tumultuous sea, Percy hastily attempts to form a means of egress. However, Luke arrives upon the deck, casts a wry insult, and raises his sword aloft.

0-two-stars

Reviewed by Soumya, Twin Hickory Library

 

Read + Review, Teen Reviews, Uncategorized

Read + Review: Stonebreaker by Peter Wartman

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Within the ancient ruins of Noridun, the nefarious demons roam the razed earth. Anya continues to struggle as she pursues the focus stones to cure her amnesiac brother. Robbed of his memory during an encounter with a demon, Anya’s nameless brother fades as the days progress. Fortunately, Toris, a traitor to demons, aids Anya upon her daunting quarry. However, the human village despises her imprudent excursions and advises her to cease the futile effort to save her brother. Toris gradually unearths his past as a demon, revealing a purged secret that may transform the fates of Anya and her brother. Mysteries unravel, and the foul legends become reality as danger grips Toris and Anya.

“Stonebreaker” swarmed with action, and feats of valor. The reader may certainly become immediately riveted by the captivating climax and prologue. The novel’s plot somewhat resembled a tumultuous current, as the tale rapidly revealed numerous twists and clues. A stunning sequel to “Over the Wall”, this novel roused a sense of thrill and suspense. Lastly, I became astounded at the author’s ability to illustrate the entire graphic novel in a monochromatic scale.

A memorable moment lies within the opening scene, as Anya discovers a scroll with a daunting legend. As she carefully navigates her favored childhood tale, Anya deftly escapes a harrowed dungeon. Rain patters the razed cobblestone path, as Anya flees the realm of demons. Sprinting to her haven with Toris, Anya confronts a builder demon, who immediately attempts to slaughter the girl.

4-stars

Reviewed by Soumya, Twin Hickory Library

Read + Review, Teen Reviews, Uncategorized

Read + Review: Through the water curtain: and other tales from around the world

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Within Cornelia Funke’s tantalizing novel resides a cornucopia of mythical tales. Deriving from the farthest reaches of the world, the foreign realm of gods and demons emerging from the pages of Funke’s collection. Artfully selected, the myths presented become displayed within a captivating environment. The myths teem with suspense, and the brief sense of rousing dread as the protagonist plummets into dire circumstances. For example, the tale of the Kotura shrouds a quaint village with a the turmoil of a blizzard. Unfortunately, the method to cease the villagers’ cruel fates demands that three daughters must embark upon a voyage fraught with doom.

In the novel, “Through the Water Curtain : And Other Tales From Around the World”, the author replenished the allure of the ancient journey of numerous influential figures. Furthermore, I enjoyed the morals she displayed at the conclusion of the story. The stories selected possessed an aspect of comedy and tragedy, a quality quite diverse. Additionally, I discovered that the author initially despised folklore, so the irony of her past remains quite amusing. Overall, however, I believe this book was a fascinating read.

A memorable moment lies within the tale of Kotura, Lord of the Winds. As the blizzard reigns terror upon the village, a minuscule cottage lies amidst the chaos, its inhabitants huddled desperately about the waning glow of a candle. A father and three daughters struggle to contemplate a means of halting Kotura’s rage. An idea sparking, the father motions his children close, and divulges a stratagem that may result in death.

4-stars

Reviewed by Soumya, Twin Hickory Library

Read + Review, Uncategorized

Read + Review: Dear Sweet Pea by Julie Murphy

[Cover]Click here to access the digital copy of this book

 

Dear Sweet Pea by Julie Murphy is about a girl named Sweet Pea and her neighbor Miss Flora Mae. Miss Flora Mae is an advice columnist who responds to people’s problems by giving them feedback to hopefully help them. Miss Flora Mae asked Sweet Pea to help her while she went on a trip to visit her ill sister. While helping Miss Flora Mae by sending her the letters that came in the mail, Sweet Pea found herself responding to some of the letters. After responding to a few, she got herself into a bit of friend drama. Meanwhile, Sweet Pea was also having to cope with her parents’ divorce. By the time Miss Flora Mae came back, Sweet Pea was the one who needed the advice.

I really enjoyed reading this book because I loved the topic. I like reading books about girls in middle school who go through friend drama, because I can relate to the main character’s problems. Overall, reading books like this keep me on the edge of my seat and they possibly can help me in real life. Since I go through similar situations it helps to know what someone else would do.

One memorable thing is how Sweet Pea struggled with regaining a friend and losing one at the same time. Sweet Pea  felt really bad after she had been leaving out Oscar. From this book, I realized that everyone makes mistakes. Sweet Pea learned that accidentally leaving out a friend can result in losing one.

4-stars-1

Reviewed by Elise, Libbie Mill Library

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Read + Review: Fake by Donna Cooner

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Click here to place a hold on this book

Fake is a captivating yet down-to-earth book about 16-year-old Maisie Fernandez, who is the target of most of the school’s notorious pranks. Maisie and her best friend Owen have had to experience endless torment for the past four years, and Maisie decides she has had enough. In order to get revenge on her former bully, Jesse Santos, she creates an online profile named Sienna. Sienna is Maisie’s confident alter ego, and within minutes, Sienna is already chatting daily with Jesse on ChitChat. Things escalate between the two, and Maisie starts to question whether or not Jesse deserves what she is planning. To make matters worse, the girl whose pictures Maisie was using to create the fake profile decides to come into the picture, making Maisie have to choose whether or not she should come clean or keep her a secret from Jesse and the others.

The book defines true reality, and it shows that you truly can be anyone on the internet. To watch Maisie’s character develop as the story progressed was entrancing. Because Maisie was embodying Sienna, she went from someone who didn’t want nor know how to stick up for herself to a courageous and self-advocating girl who wasn’t afraid to stare someone down. She learned, the hard way, to be herself and to not care about what others think about her. Fake is definitely an excellent book on real-life situations and how they can affect somebody’s life.

The most memorable thing about this book was watching Maisie and Jesse slowly connect although being complete opposites. As the story progressed, they met up in different locations and bonded during those small amounts of time studying. It was very amusing to watch Maisie realize that Jesse might not be so bad after all.

5-stars-3

Reviewed by Jennifer, Glen Allen Library